Ingredients

Care for yourself naturally

 

head-image-ing.jpg

Humans have used medicinal herbs and plants for centuries

to maintain health and promote well-being. Restore your inner balance with these active ingredients from nature.

ing1.jpg

HEMP

Hemp oil can refer to a full-spectrum oil from the Cannabis sativa plant or hemp seed oil, which is oil that comes from just the seeds of the hemp plant. Hemp seed oil has a rich profile of nutrients, fatty acids, and useful bioactive compounds, making it highly nutritious and helpful for the skin's health, resistance of infection and prevention of breakouts. The abundance of fatty acids also may make the oil an excellent choice for nourishing the skin and protecting it from inflammation, oxidation, and other causes of aging. There is very little risk of intoxication from hemp oil, as all forms of the oil come from food-grain strains of hemp. The authors of a study in the journal Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research note that food-grain strains of hemp must contain less than 0.3 percent tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

ing15.jpg

Eucalyptus

The fast growing eucalyptus tree, most commonly found in Indonesia and Australia, can reach heights of up to 20 feet. While the tree is most valued for its wood in its home countries, it is the tree’s oil that is in demand. The essential oil is obtained from the leaves and twigs by means of steam distillation. As an ingredient in candy or an inhalant, eucalyptus oils are effective against coughing and hoarseness. It is also recommended as an external application for relieving rheumatism and muscle pain.

ing3.jpg

Rosemary

Around the Mediterranean, rosemary has been used for millennia, though it was first valued for its flavor. In ancient culture, the plant was considered sacred and of the gods. In medicine, on the other hand, rosemary has only been used for a few hundred years: internally as a tea to stimulate circulation and to combat digestive disorders, and externally applied in baths to promote blood flow and stimulate circulation. It is also used to relieve rheumatism and gout-related complaints. Rosemary is a key ingredient in Mediterranean cuisine and its fragrance makes it essential for the perfume industry or use in aromatherapy. Its name comes from the Latin word rosmarinus, which literally means "dew of the sea."

ing21.jpg

Patchouli

Patchouli has been used for centuries for its strong, woodsy scent in fragrances and perfumes. The oil is distilled from the leaves of these plants which grow throughout Asia and the Caribbean. Traditionally, Patchouli has been used to induce relaxation, treat headaches, colds, nausea, diarrhea and abdominal pain; it is also thought to be an insect repellent, and has been used in Japan and Malaysia to treat venomous snake bites.

ing5.jpg

Fennel

Fennel is the most versatile of medical plants. The blossoms, leaves, seeds and fennel bulb offer valuable substances, which contribute to our well-being once processed. Fennel belongs to the family of umbellifers. The essential oil of bitter fennel is rich in trans-anethole and fenchone, which can clear the mucus from bronchial tubes. Prepared as a tea, fennel provides relief for digestive disorders.

ing6.jpg

Thyme

Thyme has a 4000 year-old history of use as a medicinal herb. Even in antiquity, a thyme bath was ordered to strengthen warriors before battle. With precious ingredients like essential oils, thymol, flavonoids, tannins and bitters, it is an essential part of herbal medicine. Essential thyme oil alone is an entire complex of high quality substances and is used to clear mucus and allow for easy breathing with colds, asthma and bronchitis. Dresdner Essenz is particularly connected to thyme, as it has long been used as an important active ingredient in our medical products.

ing7.jpg

Juniper

Today, when the word juniper is mentioned, many think of food — a rack of lamb or marinated beef just wouldn’t be the same without these citrus berries. At the same time, the fragrant wood of the juniper tree is also commonly used for smoking ham and, without its berries, the British would have never come up with their national drink, gin. Once considered one of the most important plants used in medicine in the Middle Ages, the health-promoting effect of juniper has slowly been pushed aside in today's society. Prepared as a tea, juniper not only aids digestion but also serves as a diuretic and counteracts heartburn. Externally, it is used to treat gout and rheumatism, promote circulation and relax muscles.

ing8.jpg

Lavender

Its indulgent fragrance and charming beauty are enough to describe lavender. This may remind you of lush purple lavender fields spread across Oregon in the foothills of the mountains, but lavender has more to offer than mere beauty. Infants have been gently lulled to sleep by the calming effect of lavender lotion, and adults alike trust in its effectiveness against restlessness, tension and insomnia. Prepared as a soothing bath, lavender adapts to your inner state, invigorating you when you’re tired, lifting your spirits when you’re down and calming you when you’re nervous.

ing17.jpg

Hop

Natural extract of hop cones, i.e., female hop blossoms. In addition to its primary use in the aromatization of beer, hop is also used for pharmaceutical and cosmetic products and has mainly soothing properties.

ing10.jpg

Melissa

Melissa belongs to the Lamiaceae family and comes from the Mediterranean. Due to its characteristic citrus fragrance, it is also known under the name lemon balm. The leaves of balm contain a precious essential oil, and Hildegard of Bingen recommended the herb as an agent that invigorates the heart. Due to the herb’s beneficial nature, balm was grown in monastery gardens during the Middle Ages and made into an alcoholic beverage, which served to relieve digestive disorders. Today, balm oil is used to calm nerves and anxiety and has shown itself to be effective in treating sleeping disorders.

ing11.jpg

Spruce Needle

The spruce (Latin: Picea abies) is a conifer whose range spreads across Europe, and is a member of the pine family. The spruce is referred to in vernacular as the pitch or black spruce. The smell of spruce after a rain shower is soothing and reminiscent of nature in its purest form. The essential oil from spruce needles is often used in natural healing to improve breathing. A hot tea infusion with the young shoots of the spruce is said to help relieve a cough, among other things. The unmistakable forest fragrance also soothes our spirit — when stressed and exhausted, it helps to calm nerves and provide a feeling of being grounded.

ing16.jpg

Seaweed (Laminaria Saccharina)

Seaweed (Laminaria Saccharina) The extract coming from Laminaria Saccharina, a brown algae, is loaded with skin benefits. Alginates are polysaccharides (large molecules made up of repeating sugar units), are water-loving and can form a protective film on the skin. This equates to moisturizing, skin-protecting and soothing properties. The extract also contains another polysaccharide called laminarin, which contains decongestant and lipid-reducing properties that may be beneficial for combination, acne-prone skin types.

ing13.jpg

Sea Salt

Sea salt is acquired from the sea using various methods. It is cherished not only for its taste, but also for its healing qualities for skin. In addition to sodium chloride, sea salt also contains numerous other minerals and trace elements like iodine, iron or potassium and magnesium. All Feel Naturally Healthy and Dirty Birdie bath salts are manufactured with pure sea salt.

ing14.jpg

Sesame oil

Sesame oil is extracted from the seeds of the sesame plant, which is one of the world’s oldest cultivated plants. They prosper in tropical and subtropical climate zones. Sesame seed oil is very popular when it comes to skin care because it gives the skin a natural glow. It penetrates deep into the skin and supplies it with lecithin, vitamin A and E. Sesame oil is very skin friendly, so it provides effective care for any skin type.

ing18.jpg

Green Tea

Green tea is one of the most researched teas for its health benefits. The active ingredients are called polyphenols or catechins (EGCG being the most abundant and most active catechin). Green tea has been proven to be a great antioxidant, UV protectant, anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic and antimicrobial. Because of these awesome properties, it is especially beneficial for anti-aging and for skin diseases including rosacea, acne and atopic dermatitis.

ing19.jpg

Peppermint

Mentha Piperita (Peppermint) Oil is a natural essential oil obtained from the peppermint plant, and it imparts a distinct fragrance or flavor when used in products. In cosmetic and personal care products, these ingredients may also function as skin conditioning agents

ing20.jpg

Honey

Honey is used in cosmetic products as an emollient agent, to make skin more supple and smooth. It also has humectant and moisturizing properties, due to its high sugar content.

ing1.jpg

HEMP

Hemp oil can refer to a full-spectrum oil from the Cannabis sativa plant or hemp seed oil, which is oil that comes from just the seeds of the hemp plant. Hemp seed oil has a rich profile of nutrients, fatty acids, and useful bioactive compounds, making it highly nutritious and helpful for the skin's health, resistance of infection and prevention of breakouts. The abundance of fatty acids also may make the oil an excellent choice for nourishing the skin and protecting it from inflammation, oxidation, and other causes of aging. There is very little risk of intoxication from hemp oil, as all forms of the oil come from food-grain strains of hemp. The authors of a study in the journal Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research note that food-grain strains of hemp must contain less than 0.3 percent tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

ing15.jpg

Eucalyptus

The fast growing eucalyptus tree, most commonly found in Indonesia and Australia, can reach heights of up to 20 feet. While the tree is most valued for its wood in its home countries, it is the tree’s oil that is in demand. The essential oil is obtained from the leaves and twigs by means of steam distillation. As an ingredient in candy or an inhalant, eucalyptus oils are effective against coughing and hoarseness. It is also recommended as an external application for relieving rheumatism and muscle pain.

ing3.jpg

Rosemary

Around the Mediterranean, rosemary has been used for millennia, though it was first valued for its flavor. In ancient culture, the plant was considered sacred and of the gods. In medicine, on the other hand, rosemary has only been used for a few hundred years: internally as a tea to stimulate circulation and to combat digestive disorders, and externally applied in baths to promote blood flow and stimulate circulation. It is also used to relieve rheumatism and gout-related complaints. Rosemary is a key ingredient in Mediterranean cuisine and its fragrance makes it essential for the perfume industry or use in aromatherapy. Its name comes from the Latin word rosmarinus, which literally means "dew of the sea."

ing21.jpg

Patchouli

Patchouli has been used for centuries for its strong, woodsy scent in fragrances and perfumes. The oil is distilled from the leaves of these plants which grow throughout Asia and the Caribbean. Traditionally, Patchouli has been used to induce relaxation, treat headaches, colds, nausea, diarrhea and abdominal pain; it is also thought to be an insect repellent, and has been used in Japan and Malaysia to treat venomous snake bites.

ing5.jpg

Fennel

Fennel is the most versatile of medical plants. The blossoms, leaves, seeds and fennel bulb offer valuable substances, which contribute to our well-being once processed. Fennel belongs to the family of umbellifers. The essential oil of bitter fennel is rich in trans-anethole and fenchone, which can clear the mucus from bronchial tubes. Prepared as a tea, fennel provides relief for digestive disorders.

ing6.jpg

Thyme

Thyme has a 4000 year-old history of use as a medicinal herb. Even in antiquity, a thyme bath was ordered to strengthen warriors before battle. With precious ingredients like essential oils, thymol, flavonoids, tannins and bitters, it is an essential part of herbal medicine. Essential thyme oil alone is an entire complex of high quality substances and is used to clear mucus and allow for easy breathing with colds, asthma and bronchitis. Dresdner Essenz is particularly connected to thyme, as it has long been used as an important active ingredient in our medical products.

ing7.jpg

Juniper

Today, when the word juniper is mentioned, many think of food — a rack of lamb or marinated beef just wouldn’t be the same without these citrus berries. At the same time, the fragrant wood of the juniper tree is also commonly used for smoking ham and, without its berries, the British would have never come up with their national drink, gin. Once considered one of the most important plants used in medicine in the Middle Ages, the health-promoting effect of juniper has slowly been pushed aside in today's society. Prepared as a tea, juniper not only aids digestion but also serves as a diuretic and counteracts heartburn. Externally, it is used to treat gout and rheumatism, promote circulation and relax muscles.

ing8.jpg

Lavender

Its indulgent fragrance and charming beauty are enough to describe lavender. This may remind you of lush purple lavender fields spread across Oregon in the foothills of the mountains, but lavender has more to offer than mere beauty. Infants have been gently lulled to sleep by the calming effect of lavender lotion, and adults alike trust in its effectiveness against restlessness, tension and insomnia. Prepared as a soothing bath, lavender adapts to your inner state, invigorating you when you’re tired, lifting your spirits when you’re down and calming you when you’re nervous.

ing17.jpg

Hop

Natural extract of hop cones, i.e., female hop blossoms. In addition to its primary use in the aromatization of beer, hop is also used for pharmaceutical and cosmetic products and has mainly soothing properties.

ing10.jpg

Melissa

Melissa belongs to the Lamiaceae family and comes from the Mediterranean. Due to its characteristic citrus fragrance, it is also known under the name lemon balm. The leaves of balm contain a precious essential oil, and Hildegard of Bingen recommended the herb as an agent that invigorates the heart. Due to the herb’s beneficial nature, balm was grown in monastery gardens during the Middle Ages and made into an alcoholic beverage, which served to relieve digestive disorders. Today, balm oil is used to calm nerves and anxiety and has shown itself to be effective in treating sleeping disorders.

ing11.jpg

Spruce Needle

The spruce (Latin: Picea abies) is a conifer whose range spreads across Europe, and is a member of the pine family. The spruce is referred to in vernacular as the pitch or black spruce. The smell of spruce after a rain shower is soothing and reminiscent of nature in its purest form. The essential oil from spruce needles is often used in natural healing to improve breathing. A hot tea infusion with the young shoots of the spruce is said to help relieve a cough, among other things. The unmistakable forest fragrance also soothes our spirit — when stressed and exhausted, it helps to calm nerves and provide a feeling of being grounded.

ing16.jpg

Seaweed (Laminaria Saccharina)

The extract coming from Laminaria Saccharina, a brown algae, is loaded with skin benefits. Alginates are polysaccharides (large molecules made up of repeating sugar units), are water-loving and can form a protective film on the skin. This equates to moisturizing, skin-protecting and soothing properties. The extract also contains another polysaccharide called laminarin, which contains decongestant and lipid-reducing properties that may be beneficial for combination, acne-prone skin types.

ing13.jpg

Sea Salt

Sea salt is acquired from the sea using various methods. It is cherished not only for its taste, but also for its healing qualities for skin. In addition to sodium chloride, sea salt also contains numerous other minerals and trace elements like iodine, iron or potassium and magnesium. All Feel Naturally Healthy and Dirty Birdie bath salts are manufactured with pure sea salt.

ing14.jpg

Sesame oil

Sesame oil is extracted from the seeds of the sesame plant, which is one of the world’s oldest cultivated plants. They prosper in tropical and subtropical climate zones. Sesame seed oil is very popular when it comes to skin care because it gives the skin a natural glow. It penetrates deep into the skin and supplies it with lecithin, vitamin A and E. Sesame oil is very skin friendly, so it provides effective care for any skin type.

ing18.jpg

Green Tea

Green tea is one of the most researched teas for its health benefits. The active ingredients are called polyphenols or catechins (EGCG being the most abundant and most active catechin). Green tea has been proven to be a great antioxidant, UV protectant, anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic and antimicrobial. Because of these awesome properties, it is especially beneficial for anti-aging and for skin diseases including rosacea, acne and atopic dermatitis.

ing19.jpg

Peppermint

Mentha Piperita (Peppermint) Oil is a natural essential oil obtained from the peppermint plant, and it imparts a distinct fragrance or flavor when used in products. In cosmetic and personal care products, these ingredients may also function as skin conditioning agents.

ing20.jpg

Honey

Honey is used in cosmetic products as an emollient agent, to make skin more supple and smooth. It also has humectant and moisturizing properties, due to its high sugar content.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Get the latest updates on new products and upcoming sales

No thanks